Orissa 3

We also tried wax modeling for lost wax casting.

The was was warmed then extruded through a large ‘garlic press’.

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The wax string was then wound round clay formed models.

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We made elephants.

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Again the designs were made to order for craft outlets.

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The wax thread models were then coated in another layer of clay and were then ready for casting.

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Orissa 2

In the village they also did beading using these beads and wire wrapping.

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We watched a man in his 70s make solder and then forge solder a small box.

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The forge was heated by hand turning a fan/bellows.

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The work was poorly finished, but was for the local market – the boxes were for herbal talismans worn on the arm.

Orissa 1

Holiday in India, with a jewellery theme. The first jewelers’ village made pieces to order using traditional labour intensive skills. I had a go making mustard seed beads – which are sparkly and you may see them in Traidcraft or similar catalogues.

First the wire is hammered in swaging blocks to a triangular section.

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It is then cut in bead lengths and hammered to a right angle.

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Then each piece is hammered closed around a nail, then the individual facets are hammered.

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Jade competition piece

The other piece that was largely completed in 2013 was the jade rice bowl pendant.

The back piece is photo etched with the old symbol for rice; the rice is suggested by granulation and the rice bowl is riveted onto the back, holding the jade stones in place. P and A Polishers of Hatton Garden did an amazing job gold-plating the silver for me; thanks guys. The thread is embroidery silks whipped and frayed to tassels. The piece slips over the head, but can then be moved up the threads to whatever position suits.Image

End of autumn term 2013- undiscovered landscape

The sound mussel was part of my Hidden Landscape assessment for which I got an A (ahem)

The other piece was the story necklace which I have shown some early photos of and need to take some more as it is more complete now. The rowan berry and oxidized copper necklace is stored in the story pocket. The pocket is smocked and has small pockets for the mother of pearl button, the broken watch, the scissors and ribbon for attaching the pieces, the clay pipe piece, the broken china and the pressed porcelain. These pieces can be attached to the necklace depending on the story; and other pieces can be added.

End of autumn term 2013

College has yet to start – so I shall catch up a bit with last year.

I finished my sound mussel. When opened the electronics are triggered to play the sound of a river running and bird song. It is very evocative and lonesome. So the final piece is etched copper, press formed then repousse’d to form the shell shape, the lower half was adapted so the sound elements would fit. This was then saw pierced and the two halves hammered to fit together. The internal leaf that covers the electronics was sugar etched, a hole cut for the switch mechanism and saw pierced to fit in the shell. A wee piece was riveted to the top shell to hold the switch down. The three pieces were then hinged together.

Et voila….

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musselfinalinners

slightly over Photo-shopped (apologies) It really needs a video to capture the sound.

ceramic 3d print mussel

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The guys in mechanical engineering have a 3d printer that prints in ceramic. This is it at work on ‘my’ freshwater mussel shell.

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This is the glue being printed in layers, the printer brings a layer of ceramic powder across each time it prints a glue layer.

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This is a printed shell being retrieved from the ceramic powder. It has been heated for about an hour to fix the glue.

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The shell is then dusted down and a coat of glue can be added to strengthen it.

The print can be coloured and the ceramic is used for fine detail. It feels quite powdery even when finished. Thanks to Gary for helping with this.